November 5, 2018
Adobe Captivate 2019 vs. SharePoint: The Issue is real.
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November 5, 2018
Adobe Captivate 2019 vs. SharePoint: The Issue is real.
Instructional Design Specialist at a Technology Company for 20 years.  Masters of Science Degree in Instructional Design and Technology and is a Certified Adobe Captivate Specialist
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(Note: This article was originally posted on November 4, 2018, and updated on December 14, 2018)

Recently there have been some discussions about the JSON files in Adobe Captivate 2019 and issues with SharePoint blocking them during the upload process.  This occurs on both intranet and extranet server side.  Note: This same issue can also occur in Learning Management Systems (LMS).  However, SharePoint is the focus of this article.

What is a JSON file format?

According to w3schools.com (visit w3schools.com for detailed information):

  • JSON: JavaScript Object Notation.
  • JSON is a syntax for storing and exchanging data.
  • JSON is text, written with JavaScript object notation.

The issue Adobe Captivate 2019 users seem to be experiencing is uploading the JSON files included in the project’s HTML5 output to SharePoint.  This issue is affecting users on personal and business levels.

Workaround:

Normally the SharePoint Administrator can configure the server to allow a MIME type to support JSON format.  See Upload an Adobe Captivate published output on SharePoint for more information.

However, sometimes the before mentioned action does not resolve the issue.  As a result, less tech-savvy users find themselves reaching out elsewhere for support.  This is problematic and could be costly.

Why did Adobe decide to use JSON files?  A thought is that the HTML5 publishing process generated so many loose file types to the dr folder that Adobe used the JSON format to store these files in a more efficient way.

However, it is the way in which the JSON files are now being used that is causing the issue.

The Back Story:

In the previous versions of Adobe Captivate such as 7, 8, and 9 (before updating to version 9.0.2.437) the individual loose files such as png, smartshapes, and text captions from the project’s HTML5 output were stored in the dr folder.  There could be hundreds of images in that folder.   However, SharePoint had no issue accepting these files because they were not stored in JSON.

In more recent versions of Adobe Captivate such as 2017 and 2019, the images are now stored inside of JSON files.  You may have seen the files labeled as img1, img2, img3 and so on.  Also, there is the main imgmd file that stores png files, text captions, smartshapes, and etc.  See the example image below of Adobe Captivate HTML5 Output in the dr folder.

JSON files just simply cannot be deleted and expect the project to function.  It will not. It is issues like the one above that cause user frustration.

Maybe Adobe did not intend for Adobe Captivate to be used with SharePoint.  Whatever the intention, it is happening and it is real.

The Resolution:

JSON files have to be converted to text files using the .txt or .js extension.  The most success was with using .txt.  The conversion has to occur in all JSON files located in the .dr folder of the HTML5 output as well as within the imgmd file itself followed by the same within the .index.html file.

References:

W3schools.com, (2018), “JSON – Introduction”, Retrieved on November 4, 2018, from https://www.w3schools.com/js/js_json_intro.asp

Adobe, (2018), “Upload an Adobe Captivate published output on SharePoint” Retrieved on November 4, 2018, from Adobe.com https://helpx.adobe.com/captivate/kb/upload-captivate-published-output-sharepoint.html

Image, (2018), “Adobe Captivate HTML5 Output in dr folder” Created by VickieM, November 4, 2018.

5 Comments
2019-04-10 15:04:07
2019-04-10 15:04:07

I recently tried this with Captivate 9, and it worked perfectly. However today, I just tried to do it again, and my project won’t run after changing the file names to .txt. Does anyone have any idea why it has stopped working? (Yes, I changed both the file names and the names in the imgmd.txt file).

Thank you

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2019-03-16 01:09:20
2019-03-16 01:09:20

Thank you for this. I am working in an environment which is Sharepoint as are most large corporations who use Microsoft technology.  I had not been confronted with the issue until upgraded to 2019, as they had used V7 and V9 previously. Now as the article says the issue is real. What it means is that most of the development work is now being completed with Storyline which works seamlessly with SharePoint. No one in their right mind is going to ask ID’s to try and fix this issue when they publish their files. NOT going to happen.

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2018-12-10 09:21:34
2018-12-10 09:21:34

I see that this is mentioned again as recent article, although I answered over 1 month ago. Did you ever try what I proposed? Please give feedback.

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Lieve Weymeis
's comment
2018-12-14 07:01:17
2018-12-14 07:01:17
>
Lieve Weymeis
's comment

No, I never tried what you proposed.   The JPEG or High 24-bit image quality had nothing to do with with the JSON issue from the beginning.  The issue was with the JSON extension itself.  By the way, this article is being updated again to include a resolution to the issue.

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(1)
2018-11-05 16:49:34
2018-11-05 16:49:34

Thanks for this clear explanation!

One user reported recently, that changing the image quality to JPEG or High 24-bit prevents the images to be converted to JSON. However, I have not checked this out myself, Up till now I never had to use SharePoint with any client.

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