My WIIFM Story

July 20, 2018
I've been an eLearning designer and developer since 2005. In 2015 I started my own eLearning design company. To help promote my business, I began to create Adobe Captivate video tutorials on YouTube: https://YouTube.com/PaulWilsonLearning These videos are used to attract potential clients looking for a skilled eLearning designer and developer. This strategy has proved successful as I've worked with clients from all over the globe, helping them build highly engaging eLearning solutions. My YouTube channel presented an additional benefit of attracting aspiring Captivate developers to seek me out as a teacher. I now offer both online and onsite training on Adobe Captivate, teaching the skills users need to build engaging and interactive learning.
Legend 377 posts
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eLearning Designer, Developer and Teacher
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My WIIFM Story

I've been an eLearning designer and developer since 2005. In 2015 I started my own eLearning design company. To help promote my business, I began to create Adobe Captivate video tutorials on YouTube: https://YouTube.com/PaulWilsonLearning These videos are used to attract potential clients looking for a skilled eLearning designer and developer. This strategy has proved successful as I've worked with clients from all over the globe, helping them build highly engaging eLearning solutions. My YouTube channel presented an additional benefit of attracting aspiring Captivate developers to seek me out as a teacher. I now offer both online and onsite training on Adobe Captivate, teaching the skills users need to build engaging and interactive learning.
Legend 377 posts
Followers: 298 people
July 20, 2018

One mistake that is often made by organisations who design their eLearning is with WIIFM. WIIFM stands for “what’s in it for me?” (said from the perspective of the learner). This attempts to address the motivation for the learner to proceed and ultimately complete their training. The mistake comes when the WIIFM is written from the perspective of the organisation and not truly what motivates employees.

Here is an example that I experienced when I was working at the Toronto international airport. Consulting with my stakeholder and subject matter experts the motivation for a course on safety was for the thousands of passengers that visit Toronto’s international airport and with an emphasis on the reputation of the airport as a safe place.

Upon further reflection I started to think about the employees who were going to be required to complete this course and realized that while we all want to be safe, an employees concern is not toward the reputation of the airport or to the thousands of strangers who pass through the airport daily, but instead for themselves, their families and friends (their loved ones).

It took some convincing, but my stakeholder agreed that reminding employees that their loved ones at some point will be passengers at the airport and their safety is what is ultimately important to employees. Also, concern for their own safety can be used in this instance as well. Everyone, including the families of employees, wants them to come home safe at the end of their shift. I managed to extend that even further to include their co-workers as well. Many co-workers become friends outside of work. We share in each other’s lives and their families become our families.

Try to avoid towing the corporate line when writing your course motivation section of your eLearning. It becomes far more effective when it has real meaning to the employees and not some check mark on a corporate checklist.

Comments (2)
2018-07-25 15:27:04
2018-07-25 15:27:04

Thanks Paul. It’s good to have these reminders so we get our heads off the screen and think more about the learner.

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Phil Cowcill
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2018-07-31 15:46:40
2018-07-31 15:46:40
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Phil Cowcill
's comment

Yeah, good elearning is just good learning, or at least it should be in my opinion.

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