July 31, 2017
Flipping Training on its Head: Getting Started with a Performance Support Video Solution (Part 3)
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July 31, 2017
Flipping Training on its Head: Getting Started with a Performance Support Video Solution (Part 3)
Since 1998, I have designed and developed numerous interactive, facilitator-led, technology-assisted learning and performance support tools. I hold a master’s degree in education: curriculum and instruction, with a specialization in adult education. I am also a magician.
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Over the past 2 weeks or so, I’ve posted two blog articles in which I discussed how performance support video solutions are flipping training on its head. In the first post, I talked about how traditional training stresses participants learning something at a defined time – and then going into the work area and doing what it is they learned.  I then shared how in my own experience of developing performance support tools. If you have not read that article and you are interested, here you go: https://elearning.adobe.com/2017/07/flipping-training-on-its-head-getting-started-with-a-performance-support-video-solution/

Last week, I talked about the steps required to begin developing such a solution. We looked at taking a process and breaking it down into its unique and discrete steps, so that it can be demonstrated in manageable chunks. We looked at determining the total number of steps required, how to create an index page to each video and the importance of including the length of time it takes your user to view each video. We also considered who you will need on your team and the importance of separating the need to know from the nice to know. Finally, I challenged each of you to engage in the overall process of building a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. If you missed part 2, here is the link: https://elearning.adobe.com/2017/07/flipping-training-on-its-head-getting-started-with-a-performance-support-video-solution-part-2/

Part 3

So how did it go? How many steps did you determine it takes to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich? What are they? Take a look at the “school” solution. This is what I came up with. It does not mean it is the absolute only way to do it. It’s just my approach to this project.
School Solution for Peanut Butter and Jelly
Notice that each step that I listed is separate and distinct from each other. That’s why you don’t see a step that reads “Open the peanut butter jar and spread some on the bread.” That is two separate steps.  Users may not remember how to open the jar in this case, but they’ve shown they can remove a spoon of peanut butter from the jar and spread it on the bread. Sure this is a simplistic example, so consider this more realistic situation. “Log onto your computer, then launch Adobe Captivate.” Your learner may remember how to log on, but if it is their first time using Captivate, they may not know what the desktop icon looks like or how to access the program. If you are going to give them just what they need at the moment they need it, then the performance support tool should reflect that. Having one item for “log onto your computer” and a separate item for “launch Captivate” gives users a choice and enables them to get just what they need – and no more.

perfSupport_shotListSo you know the number of steps and what they are, what next? It’s time to develop your shot list. I like to keep mine simple. I number each shot to make it easy to refer to, and then I have two columns: What Learners See, and What Learners Hear.  The “What Learners Hear” column will become the script which I will send to my voice over artist (or if you are like most developers who has to do their own voice over, you now have the script.)

Here is an example shot list for the “Gather Your Materials” step.
Completed Storyboard for one step

Now it is a matter of producing each video, then uploading it to the index page for users to access it.

I am including the complete shot list below.  I hope that this series of blog posts has been helpful as you think about creating your own performance support video solution. This is the method I’ve developed that works for me. If you’ve had success with this approach, please share it in the comments below.  If you’ve got an approach that differs from this but which works for you, please share that too. This way, our colleagues in the community can take something from each and develop a process which works for them.

Best,

CHUCK

Here is the complete shot list.

Shot Number What Learners See What Learners Hear
1 Items lined up on preparation surface. Hand points to each as it is mentioned.

To make the perfect peanut butter and jelly sandwich, you will need:

·         A clean, flat food production surface.

·         Peanut butter of your choice.

·         Jelly, jam, or preserves of your choice.

·         2 slices of sandwich bread.

·         A clean butter knife.

·         You may also want a spoon for the jelly.

2

Placing the bread slices on the surface side by side.

 

Cut to flipping the bread slices together as though the sandwich were already made.

Position the bread slices on the clean surface, side-by-side, with one slice face up and the other slice face down.

 

This step is vital because it will allow the slices of bread to evenly match together when you combine them later.

3 Unscrew the lid of the peanut butter jar. Remove the liner. Cut to shot of the liner being placed in the trash. Open the peanut butter jar by unscrewing the lid. If the jar of peanut butter is new, remove and discard the paper liner attached to the top of the jar.
4

Scoop out a dollop of peanut butter with the knife. Spread the peanut butter across one slide of the bread.

 

Scoop out another dollop of peanut butter with the knife and spread it across the other slide of bread.

Using the knife, scoop a large dollop of peanut butter and spread it onto the top of each slice of bread. Use as much peanut butter as desired.

 

Putting peanut butter on each side will prevent the bread from getting soggy from the jelly. This is especially important if preparing the sandwich ahead of time.

5 Open the jar of jelly. Open the jar of jelly using the same method you used to open the peanut butter.
6a Wiping the knife with a paper towel. Wipe the knife. This is a small but essential step because it keeps from contaminating the contents of the jelly jar with the peanut butter.
6b The subject licking the knife with his tongue – and put the universal “NO” sign on top. Be sure to use a paper towel – and not your tongue for this step.
6c Remove a spoonful of jelly from the jar.

As an alternative, you may use a clean spoon to remove the jelly from the jar.

 

 

Shot Number What Learners See What Learners Hear
7a Placing the spoon of jelly onto the bread. Then picking up the knife and evenly distributing the jelly across the surface of the peanut butter. Apply the jelly. Spread it on top of the peanut butter on one slice of the bread.
7b Show jelly oozing out of sandwich – and put the universal “NO” sign on top. Putting jelly on both sides will only lead to a mess with jelly spewing out the sides of the sandwich.
8a Flipping peanut butter only side of bread over onto the side with the jelly. Combine both slices of bread by taking the slice of bread without jelly on it and flipping it on top of the jelly of the other slide.
8b Close-up of completed sandwich. You should now have a layered PB&J sandwich with peanut butter on the top and bottom and jelly in the center.
9 Close up of shoulders/head as the subject eats and enjoys his sandwich, appearing to savor each bite. Eat and Repeat. You can now satisfy your hunger with a delicious, non-soggy peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Repeat as necessary until you are full.
10a Hand placing the peanut butter jar in the pantry. Don’t forget to clean up. Return the peanut butter jar to its location.
10b Hand placing the jelly jar inside the refrigerator door. Place the jar of jelly in the refrigerator.
10c Washing/rinsing of knife and cutting board. Wash your utensils and dishes.
10d Wiping down the countertop with a towel. Wipe the surface where you prepared your sandwich to ensure no bread crumbs or sticky residue is left behind.

 

4 Comments
2017-07-31 19:45:56
2017-07-31 19:45:56

Great post Chuck! I like your shot list. I am working on a post on the importance of storyboarding, so seeing how others document their course building is great.

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Rollin Guyden
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2017-07-31 20:15:03
2017-07-31 20:15:03
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Rollin Guyden
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Hey Chuck,

Nice post. I really like the level of detail you put to into for the “what learners hear” section. I have a similar approach with a textual script, that leads specifically to detailed visual storyboards, similar to what Rollin has suggested. When you convert your detailed shot list to a graphical/textual storyboard the client really gets a great sense of what the finished product will look like.

Cheers,
Steve

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Rollin Guyden
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2017-07-31 22:57:22
2017-07-31 22:57:22
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Rollin Guyden
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Hey Rollin,

Thanks for your kind words. Great training (and performance support systems) begin with a great storyboard. The second is never possible without the first.

Looking forward to your post.

CHUCK

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Stephen O Hearn
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2017-07-31 22:59:17
2017-07-31 22:59:17
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Stephen O Hearn
's comment

Hey Stephen,

A picture is worth a thousand words. And the “What Learners Hear” makes it very easy for the voice over artist. In addition, having the “What Learners See’ portion makes it easy for the V/O person to visualize the content so they know where to place emphasis in the narration.

CHUCK

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