Really Great eLearning Example

July 15, 2017
I've been an eLearning designer and developer since 2005. In 2015 I started my own eLearning design company. To help promote my business, I began to create Adobe Captivate video tutorials on YouTube: https://YouTube.com/PaulWilsonLearning These videos are used to attract potential clients looking for a skilled eLearning designer and developer. This strategy has proved successful as I've worked with clients from all over the globe, helping them build highly engaging eLearning solutions. My YouTube channel presented an additional benefit of attracting aspiring Captivate developers to seek me out as a teacher. I now offer both online and onsite training on Adobe Captivate, teaching the skills users need to build engaging and interactive learning.
Legend 377 posts
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eLearning Designer, Developer and Teacher
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Really Great eLearning Example

I've been an eLearning designer and developer since 2005. In 2015 I started my own eLearning design company. To help promote my business, I began to create Adobe Captivate video tutorials on YouTube: https://YouTube.com/PaulWilsonLearning These videos are used to attract potential clients looking for a skilled eLearning designer and developer. This strategy has proved successful as I've worked with clients from all over the globe, helping them build highly engaging eLearning solutions. My YouTube channel presented an additional benefit of attracting aspiring Captivate developers to seek me out as a teacher. I now offer both online and onsite training on Adobe Captivate, teaching the skills users need to build engaging and interactive learning.
Legend 377 posts
Followers: 296 people
July 15, 2017

One of the common questions I see here and get on my YouTube channel is “where can I see some samples of good eLearning to inspire me?”

Unfortunately most eLearning is someone’s intellectual property and isn’t easy to get to see. Either it’s owned by a company who developed it in-house, or paid to have it produced; or it was designed by a freelancer who isn’t about to give away their future residual income.

Occasionally I run across some really good examples and I thought if we all shared a sample of two we could all be inspired. It doesn’t matter if it was made with Adobe Captivate or not, but if you know of some good samples, please share. I’ll start.

http://www.worldwarfighter.com/hajikamal/

This course was designed by Cathy Moore with one of her clients. I’ve been following Cathy for years. She is a brilliant eLearning designer and she really understands scenario based learning and storytelling. Here is her blog post where I first learned about this example. It’s a very interesting read.

http://blog.cathy-moore.com/2010/05/elearning-example-branching-scenario/

Now it’s your turn. Please share any good examples you’ve found.

Comments (12)
2017-07-19 12:00:06
2017-07-19 12:00:06

Okay here is another example that is pretty neat.
http://www.raptmedia.com/customers/deloitte/

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Paul Wilson
's comment
2017-11-19 17:30:01
2017-11-19 17:30:01
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Paul Wilson
's comment

Hi Paul, this is an incredibly amazing example with the Interactive videos. Do you know if this was built using captivate, or is it possible to build something this amazing with captivate? If so, how can this be done…

Please help.

Thanks

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ade.bakare
's comment
2017-11-19 21:33:29
2017-11-19 21:33:29
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ade.bakare
's comment

I believe it is possible to build something like this in Captivate but I don’t know if Captivate was used.

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Paul Wilson
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2017-11-19 23:37:00
2017-11-19 23:37:00
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Paul Wilson
's comment

Thanks Paul. Any ideas on how one can go about creating something like this in captivate. I particularly like how the video pauses and allows the learner to choose an answer.

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ade.bakare
's comment
2017-11-20 01:25:50
2017-11-20 01:25:50
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ade.bakare
's comment

My guess is that the interactive stuff isn’t on top of the video at all but rather an image from the last frame of the previous video. Smartshape buttons can look like anything you want them to look like.

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2017-07-18 13:41:22
2017-07-18 13:41:22

Hi Paul – First thanks for all the great tips and how-tos! The funny thing about this ‘dilemna’ is that trainers (aka teachers) share ALL THE TIME. It’s part of the culture of our profession. This is one of the biggest issues I have with Captivate – lack of strong examples and content using the software. You know how Adobe’s biggest competitor (he who shall not be named) handles the property-rights conundrum? They have regular ‘challenges’ that they put forth to their community. They pick a theme and community members develop a really brief (but awesome) submission. The best examples are show-cased. And anyone on the www gets to see their cool stuff. That’s a pretty cool incentive right there.

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sagem15836397
's comment
2017-07-18 17:34:51
2017-07-18 17:34:51
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sagem15836397
's comment

Sage, that is a great idea having a competition to get more functional examples available. It would be awesome if such “challenges” winners could get points towards their levels, on top of the 100 points for successfully showcasing your work.

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sagem15836397
's comment
2019-01-18 21:14:19
2019-01-18 21:14:19
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sagem15836397
's comment

I’ve followed these (of he who shall not be named) and they’re very helpful. I suppose we’re all the same community, right?

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2017-07-18 11:30:07
2017-07-18 11:30:07

I’ve done a few in the past that I’ve been quite pleased with, but I’m afraid I can’t share them for the exact reasons you describe. They were medical scenarios, which lend themselves well to a branching approach. One thing I’d say is that they can quickly get out of hand and you can’t let your client keep adding things onto the end. We ended-up getting the client to storyboard each complete scenario as a flow chart on a length of wallpaper: old-fashioned perhaps but very effective.

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NeilHoskins
's comment
2017-07-18 11:39:07
2017-07-18 11:39:07
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NeilHoskins
's comment

Great idea with the wallpaper! Yes, the proprietary nature of eLearning does prevent us from sharing more.

I find the trick in avoiding “scope creep” as I’ve called what you’re describing, is to require sign off starting with your initial needs analysis and at each stage right up to the course development. You can always go back to the previous sign off and remind them that they are outside of the scope and there would be additional cost or delays associated with their changes.

Also ask them what learning objective their additions satisfy. They usually can’t answer and if they do, point to the other learning activities that already satisfy those objectives. Every redundant learning is costing the company by keeping employee’s bums in those seats longer.

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NeilHoskins
's comment
2018-06-28 04:35:17
2018-06-28 04:35:17
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NeilHoskins
's comment

This post and thread made me smile. I like the low-tech storyboard solution in face to face settings. Thank you for sharing your experiences and for making me smile.

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2017-07-15 14:03:41
2017-07-15 14:03:41

I should point out that the Haji Kamal scenario is Flash based so you will have to view it on desktop, not mobile.

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